When You’re Looking for One in a Millennial

entrepreneur-593358_1280Every day, thousands of millennials are entering the workforce for the first time. Now, many small business owners are considering hiring these individuals and asking what they need to consider before they opt to hire them.

There is no denying that the millennial generation is much different than the generation of workers that has come before them.  This means that as a small business owner, you’ll need to make some changes to your business culture in order to accommodate the very unique needs of this particular group.

I’ve outlined a few key items you might want to consider before hiring millennial workers to ensure success for both your company and your potential millennial hire.

  • Flexibility

Millennial workers, unlike any other generation before them, are keen on the idea of having office hours that suit their personal needs. How flexible are you willing to be with your office hours? When interviewing potential millennial candidates, ask about their work schedule expectations. If you run a business that can only accommodate the hours of 9am to 5pm, then you can expect a millennial may not find your opening suitable to them.

  • Millennials want to be valued

Millennials need a great deal of validation from and communication with their supervisor/manager to let them know how they are doing, and to give them praise (preferably in a group setting) when they have done a good job. In the workplace, this may require more of your time and attention. They want to be noticed for their work and you will need to be available to give them ongoing feedback. Do you have the time to provide them with ongoing feedback and praise? If not, a millennial may not feel valued in your office.

  • Company Culture

Millennial workers are expecting an inclusive and exciting company culture that promotes social relationships and fosters innovation. If you have other millennial staff, or see your company hosting social nights or team-building activities, a millennial might fit in well. Their need to work and collaborate with a team is key to their success. Is your office made up of employees aged 45+? If so, a millennial worker might feel like an outsider and have trouble fitting in.

There is no doubt this new generation of workers are the future of business, and they have so much to offer, but we need to learn how to accommodate their needs if we are to add them to our workforce.

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Generations Working Together in the Workplace

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How many different generations are represented in your workplace? Depending on size and industry, it is possible for some companies to employ personnel from up to five different generations! Growing up with vastly different value systems and qualities of life, employees from each generation have distinct strengths and challenges, so how do you leverage the skill sets of your team to be as productive as it can be?

Identifying and understanding the profiles of the generations in your workplace is a good place to start:

The Traditionals (born 1933-1945): Employees in this generation were raised in the aftermath of the Great Depression, where they understood how hard work led to increased financial stability and survival. Traditionals embody discipline, self-sacrifice, loyalty and are respectful of authority.

The Baby-Boomers (born 1946-1964): Baby-Boomers were born into a culture of prosperity and affluence after World War II, valuing achievement and embracing an “anything is possible” attitude. Baby-Boomer employees in the workplace are perceived as hardworking and productive and value strong nuclear family life. Perhaps because of their more rigid upbringing, both Traditionals and Baby-Boomers are often rated low in adaptability to change and are highly motivated by health and retirement benefits.

Generation X (born 1965-1979): The first generation where more children grew up with single parents or blended families, Gen-X’ers are known for their independence, resilience and adaptability and are excellent problem-solvers. Because of their independent nature, Gen-X’ers are less likely to be regarded by their peers as team players. This generation also values work flexibility, especially with regards to family and vacation time.

Generation Y/Millennials (born 1980-1995): Highly socialized, technologically savvy and always multi-tasking, Millennials are entering the workplace in droves. This generation often prefers the group setting to individual work, and is most enthusiastic about being promoted and moving up in the ranks. This group is sometimes criticized for being entitled, especially as the world becomes more and more reliant upon technology that Millennials grew up with.

Linksters (born 1995-present): You are less likely to see this generation in your workplace just yet, as they are entering young-adulthood, post-secondary education or the workforce. Even more so than Millennials, Linksters were born into a world where technology was entrenched in their education and where they have known what a smartphone was since they were old enough to walk.

Now that you have a better sense of some of the strengths and challenges of the different generations in your office, how do you manage your team so that your business is the most productive it can be?

Invest in Training: In order to help your employees understand where they fit within your organization and with each other, Personality Assessment Training and Team-Building Training can provide a great outlet for communication and promoting self-awareness. Personality assessment encourages your employees to be aware of their own strengths and challenges and fosters an environment where emotional intelligence is as highly valued as intellectual intelligence. In combination with team training, your employees understand how they can leverage their strengths and weaknesses with those of their peers.

Forge connections: As you can see from the profiles above, some of the traits specific to one group can be highly complementary to another’s, such as the Baby-Boomers’ productivity and the Millennials’ technological knowledge. Try creating an environment for strategic mentorship, matching personalities that you believe would learn well from each other, where both employees feel like their skills are respected.

Assign tasks strategically:  Passionate employees are productive employees. When it’s possible, assign tasks that tap into what they love doing and what they are good at. Communicate openly about why you chose them for a specific task so that they are consistently made aware of their value in your eyes.

Find the appropriate motivation: If Baby-Boomers and Gen-X’ers, for example, value work-flexibility, family life and benefits, these are tools you can use to motivate their performance and achievements. For Millennials, make sure you communicate what they can do to improve in their role and how they can earn that promotion they are looking for. Try adjusting your style to tap into the distinct motivations of each group.

The whole is always greater than the sum of its parts, so no matter how much changes across the decades, collaboration will never be outdated. Invest in your employees and promote an environment of mutual appreciation for what each individual brings to the organization. Do you know of any other ways you can support your employees with regards to generational differences? I look forward to your thoughts below!

Sources:

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/183720

http://www.reliableplant.com/Read/26581/Five-generations-work-together

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-millennials-gen-x-and-boomers-shape-the-workplace-2013-9

http://www.economist.com/news/business/21586831-businesses-are-worrying-about-how-manage-different-age-groups-widely-different